2023-24 Department of Mathematics and Statistics Events



 

April, 2024

Monday
April 1
10:00 am
SE 215

Crypto Café

Join the faculty and students of Cryptography for a biweekly reading seminar on multi-party computations.

Wednesday
April 3
5:00 PM
SE 215

FAU Math Club

Join your friends and other math enthusiasts at FAU's Math Club events!  The purpose of our Club is to improve academic ability, spread awareness of mathematics’ importance, and share a passion for all fields of mathematics!

The club is open to all majors and all math backgrounds. Activities at the club will include:

  • Discussion of mathematics’ applications and importance.
  • Study sessions for mathematical concepts.
  • Group problem solving of math problems from a variety of fields, including set theory, algebra, geometry, topology, and more.
  • Presentation of exciting mathematical research and concepts.
  • Discussions on graduate school and employment

Snacks are always available!  See you there!

Thursday
April 4
11:00 a.m.
SE 215

Analysis and Applications Seminar

Speaker : J.P. Lessard, McGill University 

Title : Computer-assisted proofs for differential equations with non-polynomial nonlinearities via the FFT.

Abstract : This presentation introduces a methodology for generating computer-assisted proofs (CAPs) establishing the existence of solutions for nonlinear differential equations with non-polynomial analytic nonlinearities. Our approach integrates the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm with interval arithmetic and a Newton-Kantorovich argument to construct CAPs effectively. Notably, to rigorously manage the Fourier coefficients of the nonlinear term Fourier series, we leverage insights from complex analysis and the Discrete Poisson Summation Formula. We showcase the applicability of our method through two examples: firstly, verifying the existence of periodic orbits in the Mackey-Glass (delay) equation, and secondly, proving the existence of periodic localized traveling waves in the two-dimensional suspension bridge equation.

Saturday 
April 6
2:30-4 pm
PS 112

Math Circle at FAU

Welcome to Math Circle!  The main purpose of the circle is to have fun with mathematics while learning something in the process. We will be discussing and solving problems, having friendly competitions, playing mathematical games. The purpose of this circle is to amplify the mathematical knowledge of students who like math, and do it in a fun way, we will also look at some AMC problems, and see how what was seen in the circle applies. We will be meeting every other Saturday, beginning Saturday, September 23, 2023.

It is important to emphasize what these circle meetings are NOT. They are not classes or lectures. Students are free to walk about and talk.

Source of the Problems:  The majority of problems will come from very diverse sources, old AMC competitions, the Moscow Math Circle Problem book, historical sources (for example Fibonacci's Liber Abaci), etc. A few will be made up by us. Sources will not usually be credited but credits will be revealed upon request, if we know the source.

Registration is FREE!    Register Here for Fall, 2024 Math Circles

Monday
April 8
10:00 am
SE 215
Zoom

Crypto Café

Speaker :  Dr. Francesco Sica, Assistant Professor, Florida Atlantic University    +Zoom (click here)

Title : Acceleration of multiscalar multiplication for zkSNARKs  FLYER

Abstract :  The main computational bottleneck in the implementation of zero-knowledge succinct arguments of knowledge (zkSNARKs) based on elliptic curves, such as Pinocchio, is the evaluation (called multiscalar multiplication) ∑i=1naiPi\sum_{i=1}^n a_i P_i

+Zoom (click here)

Monday
April 8
11:00 am
SE 215
Zoom

MS Presentation

Speaker:   Francis Boateng, MS Candidate

Title:  Influencing Under-Five Mortality in Rural-Urban Ghana: An Applied Survival Analysis

Abstract:  In this presentation, we explore the application of the Breslow Method for Ties in analyzing survival probability, utilizing data from the 2014 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey (GDHS). Focusing on Ghana's rural and urban contexts, we investigate the socio-economic and demographic factors influencing under-five mortality. This approach assumes a constant hazard function within each interval between event times. Our findings highlight maternal age, mother's education, household wealth index quintile, place of delivery, and birth order as significant determinants of child survival in Ghana. Moreover, the influence of these determinants varies between urban and rural settings. The study sheds light on the nuanced dynamics shaping child survival outcomes, contributing to understanding health disparities across different socio-economic contexts.

All are cordially invited.

Monday
April 8
5:00 pm
Sandbox
(LY 103)
Wimberly
Library

SIAM Meeting (FAU Student Chapter)

SIAM (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) fosters the development of applied mathematical and computational methodologies needed in various application areas. Applied mathematics, in partnership with computational science, is essential in solving many real-world problems. Through publications, research, and community, the mission of SIAM is to build cooperation between mathematics and the worlds of science and technology.
Florida Atlantic University's Student Chapter of SIAM encourages interdisciplinary participation by students from many departments on campus and attempt to make mathematics and its applications equally enjoyable and accessible. 

We hope to see you there!

Thursday
April 11
11:00 am
SE 215

Analysis and Applications Seminar

Speaker:  Joan Gimeno, Universitat de Barcelona

Title:  New Solutions from Functional Perturbed Uniformly Hyperbolic Trajectories

Abstract:  We develop a method to construct solutions of some (retarded or advanced) equations.  We assume that the equations considered are formally close to an ODE and that the ODE admits hyperbolic solutions (that is, perturbations
transversal to a trajectory grow exponentially either in the past or in the future) and we show that there are solutions of the functional equation close to these hyperbolic solutions of the ODE.  The method of proof does not require to formulate the delayed problem as an evolution for a class of initial data.  The main result is formulated in an "a-posteriori" format and allows to show that solutions obtained by non-rigorous approximations are close (in some
precise sense) to true solutions.

A prime application is on the motion of point charges interacting via the fully relativistic Lienard-Wiechert potentials (as suggested by J.A. Wheeler and R.P. Feynman in the 1940's).  These are retarded equations, but the delay depends implicitly on the trajectory.  In this electrodynamics (or gravitational) case, our result allows to compare the hyperbolic solutions of several post-Newtonian approximations or numerical approximations with the solutions of the Lienard-Wiechert interaction.

This is a joint work with R. de la Llave and J. Yang.

Thursday
April 11
5:00 pm
SE 215

FAU Math Club

Join your friends and other math enthusiasts at FAU's Math Club events!  The purpose of our Club is to improve academic ability, spread awareness of mathematics’ importance, and share a passion for all fields of mathematics!

The club is open to all majors and all math backgrounds. Activities at the club will include:

  • Discussion of mathematics’ applications and importance.
  • Study sessions for mathematical concepts.
  • Group problem solving of math problems from a variety of fields, including set theory, algebra, geometry, topology, and more.
  • Presentation of exciting mathematical research and concepts.
  • Discussions on graduate school and employment

Snacks are always available!  See you there!

Friday
April 12
4:00 pm
SE 215 

Complex Analysis and Nonlinear Dynamic colloquium

Speaker: Alex Stokolos, Georgia Southern University

Title: Geometric complex analysis and cycles detection in nonlinear dynamics

Abstract:  In the talk, I will discuss a remarkable connection between the problem of long cycles detection in nonlinear autonomous dynamical systems and geometric complex analysis. The presentation will be accessible to everyone who took a standard Complex Analysis course.

Saturday 
April 13
2:30-4 pm
PS 112

Math Circle at FAU

Welcome to Math Circle!  The main purpose of the circle is to have fun with mathematics while learning something in the process. We will be discussing and solving problems, having friendly competitions, playing mathematical games. The purpose of this circle is to amplify the mathematical knowledge of students who like math, and do it in a fun way, we will also look at some AMC problems, and see how what was seen in the circle applies. We will be meeting every other Saturday, beginning Saturday, September 23, 2023.

It is important to emphasize what these circle meetings are NOT. They are not classes or lectures. Students are free to walk about and talk.

Source of the Problems:  The majority of problems will come from very diverse sources, old AMC competitions, the Moscow Math Circle Problem book, historical sources (for example Fibonacci's Liber Abaci), etc. A few will be made up by us. Sources will not usually be credited but credits will be revealed upon request, if we know the source.

Registration is FREE!    Register Here for Fall, 2024 Math Circles

Monday
April 15
10:00 am
SE 215

Crypto Café

Join the faculty and students of Cryptography for a biweekly reading seminar on multi-party computations.

Wednesday
April 17
5:00 PM
SE 215

FAU Math Club

Join your friends and other math enthusiasts at FAU's Math Club events!  The purpose of our Club is to improve academic ability, spread awareness of mathematics’ importance, and share a passion for all fields of mathematics!

The club is open to all majors and all math backgrounds. Activities at the club will include:

  • Discussion of mathematics’ applications and importance.
  • Study sessions for mathematical concepts.
  • Group problem solving of math problems from a variety of fields, including set theory, algebra, geometry, topology, and more.
  • Presentation of exciting mathematical research and concepts.
  • Discussions on graduate school and employment

Snacks are always available!  See you there!

Thursday
April 18
11:00 am
SE 215

MS Presentation

MS Candidate: Fatemeh Fogh

Title: Parametrization Method for Stable and Unstable Manifolds for Studying Fixed Points

Abstract: Utilizing a parametric representation of the stable and unstable manifolds, we demonstrate that for certain parameter values (specifically in the scenario initially explored by Hénon), the Hénon mapping exhibits a transversal homoclinic orbit.

All are cordially invited.

Sunday
April 21
8:00 a.m.
SE-43

Assocation for Women in Mathematics (FAU Student Chapter) presents

Florida Women in Math Day 2024

All genders, backgrounds and ages are welcome to attend and present at Floida Women in Math Day!  Come and enjoy a career panel student posters a scavenger hunt and FREE Breakfast, lunch and refreshments!

FLYER for more information

Monday
April 22
10:00 am
SE 215
ZOOM

Crypto Café

Speaker:  TBA

Title:  TBA

Abstract:  TBA

Tuesday
April 23
11:00 am
SE 215
Zoom

Ph.D. Dissertation Defense 

Speaker:  Dominic Gold, Ph.D. candidate

Advisor: Dr. Francis Motta

Title: Privacy-Preserving Topological Data Analysis Using Homomorphic Encryption

Abstract:  Computational tools grounded in algebraic topology, known collectively as topological data analysis (TDA), have been used for dimensionality-reduction to preserve salient and discriminating features in data. This faithful but compressed representation of data through TDA's flagship method, persistent homology (PH), motivates its use to address the complexity, depth, and inefficiency issues present in privacy-preserving, homomorphic encryption (HE)-based machine learning (ML) models, which permit a data provider (often referred to as the Client) to outsource computational tasks on their encrypted data to a computationally-superior but semi-honest party (the Server). This work introduces efforts to adapt the well-established TDA-ML pipeline on encrypted data to realize the benefits TDA can provide to HE's computational limitations as well as provide HE's provable security on the sensitive data domains in which TDA has found success in (e.g., sequence, gene expression, imaging). The privacy-protecting technologies which could emerge from this foundational work will lead to direct improvements to the accessibility and equitability of health care systems. ML promises to reduce biases and improve accuracies of diagnoses, and enabling such models to act on sensitive biomedical data without exposing it will improve trustworthiness of these systems.

To adapt the beginning steps of the TDA-ML pipeline, we create an HE-compatible arithmetic circuit of the fundamental map to compute PH on an encrypted boundary matrix for further use in downstream model development (with a complete construction, parameter selection guarantees, and error analysis). We achieve this by modifying the logical structure of the map and by developing new arithmetic circuits to replace its computational and conditional statements. We also show work in adapting the terminal steps of the TDA-ML pipeline to realize the boons TDA affords HE-ML models on the MNIST digits dataset using a logistic regression (LR) classifier. We demonstrated that the TDA methods chosen improve encrypted model inference with a 10-25 fold reduction in amortized time while improving model accuracy up to 1.4% compared to naive reductions that used downscaling/resizing, and we show the first steps in realizing these same improvements on encrypted model training.

Please contact Dr. Hongwei Long for an electronic copy of the dissertation.

Zoom Meeting link:   https://fau-edu.zoom.us/my/dgold2012?omn=81121210837

All are cordially invited.

Wednesday
April 25
5:00 pm
SE 215

FAU Math Club

Join your friends and other math enthusiasts at FAU's Math Club events!  The purpose of our Club is to improve academic ability, spread awareness of mathematics’ importance, and share a passion for all fields of mathematics!

The club is open to all majors and all math backgrounds. Activities at the club will include:

  • Discussion of mathematics’ applications and importance.
  • Study sessions for mathematical concepts.
  • Group problem solving of math problems from a variety of fields, including set theory, algebra, geometry, topology, and more.
  • Presentation of exciting mathematical research and concepts.
  • Discussions on graduate school and employment

Snacks are always available!  See you there!

Saturday 
April 27
2:30-4 pm
PS 112

Math Circle at FAU

Welcome to Math Circle!  The main purpose of the circle is to have fun with mathematics while learning something in the process. We will be discussing and solving problems, having friendly competitions, playing mathematical games. The purpose of this circle is to amplify the mathematical knowledge of students who like math, and do it in a fun way, we will also look at some AMC problems, and see how what was seen in the circle applies. We will be meeting every other Saturday, beginning Saturday, September 23, 2023.

It is important to emphasize what these circle meetings are NOT. They are not classes or lectures. Students are free to walk about and talk.

Source of the Problems:  The majority of problems will come from very diverse sources, old AMC competitions, the Moscow Math Circle Problem book, historical sources (for example Fibonacci's Liber Abaci), etc. A few will be made up by us. Sources will not usually be credited but credits will be revealed upon request, if we know the source.

Registration is FREE!    Register Here for Fall, 2024 Math Circles

Monday
April 29
10:00 am
Se 215

Crypto Café

Join the faculty and students of Cryptography for a biweekly reading seminar on multi-party computations.

 

May, 2024

Saturday May, 11
2:30-4 pm
PS 112

Math Circle at FAU

Welcome to Math Circle!  The main purpose of the circle is to have fun with mathematics while learning something in the process. We will be discussing and solving problems, having friendly competitions, playing mathematical games. The purpose of this circle is to amplify the mathematical knowledge of students who like math, and do it in a fun way, we will also look at some AMC problems, and see how what was seen in the circle applies. We will be meeting every other Saturday, beginning Saturday, September 23, 2023.

It is important to emphasize what these circle meetings are NOT. They are not classes or lectures. Students are free to walk about and talk.

Source of the Problems:  The majority of problems will come from very diverse sources, old AMC competitions, the Moscow Math Circle Problem book, historical sources (for example Fibonacci's Liber Abaci), etc. A few will be made up by us. Sources will not usually be credited but credits will be revealed upon request, if we know the source.

Registration is FREE!    Register Here for Fall, 2024 Math Circles

 

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View Events from 2022-23 Academic Year Here

View Events from 2020-21 Academic Year Here

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